Aviation news analysis
50 SKY SHADES - World aviation news

EgyptAir black boxes impossible to recover before 12 days: investigators

Download: Printable PDF Date: 30 May 2016 01:39 category:
Publisher:
EgyptAir black boxes impossible to recover before 12 days: investigators - Airlines publisher
Krista Kuznecova
Country: Egypt Aircraft: Airplanes Airline: Egypt Air
Source: ABC

Investigators into EgyptAir's plane crash need at least 12 days to recover its black boxes as they await a ship that can retrieve them from the bottom of the Mediterranean, investigation sources say.

Key points:

  • 'Good chance' black boxes recovered in 12 days
  • Black boxes are at a depth of about 3,000 metres
  • No theory is currently favoured as the official cause of the crash

The Airbus A320 plane crashed into the Mediterranean with 66 people on board during a May 19 flight from Paris to Cairo, after disappearing from radar screens.

Investigators are in a race against time to find the flight recorders, known as the black boxes, which have enough battery power to emit signals for four or five weeks.

Egypt and France have signed agreements with two French companies specialising in deep water searches, Alseamar and Deep Ocean Search (DOS).

"Those two companies have complementary roles: the first is for locating the pings of the black boxes [the signal being emitted by the black boxes' beacon], while the second is for diving and recovering them" with the help of a robot, a source close to the investigation said from Cairo, requesting anonymity.

"But the DOS specialised ship left the Irish sea Saturday and it will reach the perceived crash site only in around 12 days, after having the Egyptian and French investigators embark in Alexandria."

The investigators are searching for the black boxes at a depth of around 3,000 metres, some 290 kilometres north of the Egyptian coast.

'Good chance of recovering black boxes': investigators

Three of Alseamar's DETECTOR-6000 acoustic detection systems, which submerged can detect pings for up to 4,000 to 5,000 metres below sea level, have left the French island of Corsica to the crash site on Thursday onboard Laplace, a French navy ship.

It will arrive at the perceived crash site "Sunday, or Monday at the latest," according to one of the sources.

"While we are waiting for the DOS ship, equipped for detecting the pings in deep waters, but more importantly the robots capable of descending up to 6,000 metres to recover the black boxes, we will not be wasting time as Laplace will be trying to locate them in the meantime," said one of the investigation sources.

They added that after 12 days, "there is a very good chance of recovering the flight recordings thanks to the combination of these two French companies."

The recordings could help investigators determine the reason for the crash.

The plane was carrying passengers from different nationalities, including Egyptians, French, and one dual Australian-UK national

Egypt's Aviation Minister had initially said a terrorist attack was most likely to have brought down the plane, but a technical failure is also likely. 

France's aviation safety agency has said the aircraft transmitted automated messages indicating smoke in the cabin and a fault in the flight control unit minutes before losing contact.

 



Loading comments for EgyptAir black boxes impossible to recover before 12 days: investigators...


Recommended

ALSIM to produce Flight Training devices in the United States

Due to continued growth and demand in the North America, as well as Latin America, Alsim will begin producing many of its simulator products in the United States (U.S.) starting in mid-2019. Alsim'...

ExecuJet becomes provider of Honeywell TFE731 Major Maintenance in EMEAI

ExecuJet, part of the Luxaviation Group, is celebrating becoming the provider of major maintenance on Honeywell TFE731 engines in the EMEAI region (encompassing Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Ind...

Five Ways Airlines of North America are Dealing with Empty Cockpits

The looming dearth of pilots threatening global aviation is no news, however, the ratio it affects airlines differs from region to region, and so do subsequent measures taken to curb the shortage. Lac...

H145 provides air ambulance services to remote communities in Wales

The Welsh charity, Wales Air Ambulance, operates three H145s for helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in Wales, plus an H135 for Childrens Wales Air Ambulance, making them the largest H145 ope...