Aviation news analysis
50 SKY SHADES - World aviation news

Lockheed Martin Closes In On Shrinking the Telescope

Download: Printable PDF Date: 06 Aug 2017 10:48 category:
Publisher:
Lockheed Martin Closes In On Shrinking the Telescope - Manufacturer publisher
Tatjana Obrazcova
Country: United States

Lockheed Martin revealed the first images from an experimental, ultra-thin optical instrument, showing it could be possible to shrink space telescopes to a sliver of the size of today's systems while maintaining equivalent resolution.

Weighing 90 percent less than a typical telescope, the Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-Optical Reconnaissance (SPIDER) opens a path for extremely lightweight optical instruments, allowing for more hosted payloads or smaller spacecraft. More broadly, the sensor technology has applications for aircraft and other vehicles—anywhere that depends on small optical sensors. The future could see UAVs with imagers laid flat underneath their wings, and cars could have imaging sensors that are flush against their grills.

The SPIDER project has roots in research funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Lockheed Martin independently completed this phase of research at its Advanced Technology Center (ATC).

"This is generation-after-next capability we're building from the ground up," said Scott Fouse, ATC vice president. "Our goal is to replicate the same performance of a space telescope in an instrument that is about an inch thick. That's never been done before. We're on our way to make space imaging a low-cost capability so our customers can see more, explore more and learn more."

The system uses tiny lenses to feed optical data divided and recombined in a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), which was originally designed for telecommunications at the University of California, Davis. Using these chips in a different way, Lockheed Martin researchers unlocked new potential for ultra-thin telescopes using a technique called interferometric imaging.

The tests involved a PIC aligned to a series of 30 lenses, each smaller than a millimeter across. An optical system simulated the distance from space to the ground, where scenes were illuminated and rotated. The first image included a standard bar test pattern, and the second image showed the overhead view of a complex rail yard.

The lenses and PIC comprise one section of a full instrument to be assembled in the next project phase. The team plans to increase the resolution and field of view in future phases.

The initial findings from this project were presented today at the Pacific Rim Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-Pacific Rim) in Singapore.



Loading comments for Lockheed Martin Closes In On Shrinking the Telescope...


Recommended

How to Secure a Business Deal When You’re Out of Office

Striking a business deal used to be a rigid and linear affair. It involved a great deal of planning; orchestrating meeting places, inviting attendees and marking dates on calendars. Some of the more i...

Captain Peter Weger celebrates the end of a 50-year flying career

Last flight aboard a Dornier 328 turboprop from Farnborough Airport, UK to Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany Captain Peter Weger has rounded off a stellar 50 years of uninterrupted flying with a positionin...

Air BP presents carbon offsetting program for business aviation at LABACE 2018

Air BP, the international aviation fuel products and services supplier, will highlight its pioneering carbon offset program for business aviation in Brazil at LABACE, the largest business aviation con...

ExecuJet welcomes first Pilatus PC-24 to Africa

ExecuJet, part of the Luxaviation Group, is announcing that it will be the first business aviation company to operate and manage a Pilatus PC-24 Super Versatile Jet in Africa.  The aircraft wi...